1:700 WW1 Destroyers

Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
152
Likes
230
Points
43
First Name
Andrew
#1
These are two destroyers that my Great Uncle served on during the Great War. He died on board Redgauntlet in October 1918 of Spanish Flu. (The flu epidemic killed more than the war did!)
I scratchbuilt them from polyurethane with custom drawn etchings. The figures are only a couple of mm's tall.

435939[1].jpg

435940[1].jpg

435941[1].jpg

The 'water' is made from plaster poured onto scrunched aluminium foil and then given lots of layers of lacquer.
 
Joined
Jan 18, 2012
Messages
10,029
Likes
3,634
Points
113
First Name
Joe
#2
Superb builds Andrew. The plaques are a nice idea, showing your connection with the ships. A sad story re the flu though.
 

Stevekir

Returning Beginner
Joined
Nov 4, 2012
Messages
1,780
Likes
332
Points
83
First Name
Steve
#3
Very handsome models. Thanks for the tip on making "water".
 

Jim R

SMF Poster
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
1,035
Likes
803
Points
113
First Name
Jim
#5
Hi Andy
A couple of lovely models. A great tribute to your Great Uncle. Not heard of that method for modelling water.
Jim
 

SimonT

SMF Poster
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
291
Likes
349
Points
63
Location
Yorkshire
First Name
Simon
#6
Excellent Andy :thumb2:

Having the facilities for making your own etch is a real bonus - the railings and little figures are great
 

Stevekir

Returning Beginner
Joined
Nov 4, 2012
Messages
1,780
Likes
332
Points
83
First Name
Steve
#7
Excellent Andy :thumb2:

Having the facilities for making your own etch is a real bonus - the railings and little figures are great
I did some etching about 30 years ago and it was very successful for railway modelling. One item was the curly cast iron ends to a railway station platform bench. At 1/72 scale it was just over half an inch in height. I found somewhere a graphic design and photographed it on to 35 mm transparent photographic film. That produced a black and white slide at the right scale. Next, a thin copper sheet was painted with a resist which when illuminated by light turned opaque. I fixed the slide on it and exposed the copper to light. The opaque parts were a copy of the item. The copper sheet was then put into a bath of ferric chloride:

(
You do not have permission to view link Log in or register now.
)

After several minutes the parts of the film that were clear had been eaten through, leaving the item. The following site gives full details, using a PCB as an example but bench ends etc. are done the same way. It seems complex but it is doable.

You do not have permission to view link Log in or register now.
 
Top