Minicraft SS100 Jaguar (1/16th)

Jim R

SMF Poster
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
814
Likes
634
Points
93
First Name
Jim
#1
Hi all
Inspired by the cars I have seen built on this forum I thought I'd have a go at one. The SS100 is one of my dream cars and if I ever had £250,000+ going spare I would buy one. The car was built between 1936 and 1941. The SS is reckoned to stand for Swallow Sidecars and the 100 is the theoretical top speed. In 1945 the company dropped the SS in favour of Jaguar for obvious reasons.
The kit I have is from Minicraft. It is out of production, rather old, has terrible reviews and, if you can find it, stupidly expensive. Since opening the box and making a start I can add - hopeless instructions and poor fitting parts. I was actually very lucky, or unlucky, to have the winning eBay bid and it came delivered for just over £30.
P1050398.JPG
One strange thing is that the sprues are different colours. Mostly for no apparent reason. Does make for a colourful build though. Lots of pin marks and mould slippage. I started with the engine.
P1050402.JPG
P1050403.JPG
In the last photo the three holes under the rocker cover should have been the same size. For some reason two were oversize and so had to be filled and re-drilled.

One sprue is 'chromed'. Looking at it many of the parts will need the chrome stripping off and repainting in a more 'scale like' aluminium finish. Any suggestions for stripping the parts and what metallic paint to use would be much appreciated.

I hope some of you may feel this is worth following. If for no other reason than to get a good laugh and learn some colourful language!!
Jim
 

Dave Ward

SMF Poster
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
363
Likes
499
Points
63
Location
South Gloucestershire
First Name
David
#2
Brave man Jim!
Removing chrome? Fairy Power Spray. Put the bits/sprues in a good quality polybag, after spraying with FPS. Leave. After a day or so - wash thoroughly, maybe using a stiff brush for the corners - repeat if there are still traces of chrome. Don't let the thing dry out - it only works whilst it's wet.
I've had good results with Vallejo Metal Color Aluminium, or Dull Aluminium. At 1/16 scale good surface preparation will be paramount
Good Luck
Dave
 

Steve O

SMF Poster
Joined
Dec 24, 2017
Messages
254
Likes
134
Points
43
Location
Staffs.
First Name
Steve
#3
Jim i am sure you will master it and show it who's the boss, my motto is if it don't fit make it, i look forward to seeing how you get on with it.

Good luck Steve.
 
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
883
Likes
426
Points
63
Location
Salisbury
First Name
Tim
#4
Hi Jim
Another call for chrome removal is household bleach. A soak in a plastic container will lift the part absolutely clean in minutes. Rinse well afterwards though and be sensible about splashes, drips etc.
For repaint alclad is my paint of choice, because it has the finest pigment I think...clean up and prime the part, then polish with fine abrasive paper from someone like Albion alloys, then paint in gloss black. Once the black is dry sparingly paint with alclad chrome and you will be amazed with the result.....
I might be wrong, but didn’t matchbox make a smaller scale one of these?
Cheers
Tim
 

Dave Ward

SMF Poster
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
363
Likes
499
Points
63
Location
South Gloucestershire
First Name
David
#5
Tim,
I have to agree that Alclad is superb - the downside for me is that the stink makes me nauseous!! I may just be sensitive to the fumes, but I can't use it. :disappointed2: The Vallejo stuff is water based, and doesn't give the same problem
Dave
 
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
883
Likes
426
Points
63
Location
Salisbury
First Name
Tim
#6
Agree Dave, i5 does stink. I don’t use it without a good respirator, it is basically cellulose paint such as that which was used to paint cars such as the SS 100...but then I use Mr Colour levelling thinners as well, which is almost as bad.
Tim
 

Jim R

SMF Poster
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
814
Likes
634
Points
93
First Name
Jim
#7
Hi All
Dave, Tim and Steve - welcome to the madhouse. Dave and Tim thanks for the advice - noted :thumb2:
Did a bit of an experiment with chrome removal. Used some of the sprue edge and tried soaking in Mr Muscle Oven Cleaner, bleach, lacquer thinner, Jeyes Fluid, nail polish remover (acetone) and Fairy Power Spray. The Mr M and the FPS worked well within a couple of hours. The bleach worked a bit. The thinner, acetone and Jeyes fluid did nowt!! Although I did get a rollocking from the missus for stinking out the kitchen with the Jeyes Fluid!
On with the Jaguar. It really is a hopeless kit. Lots of filling and fettling needed. Made some progress on the engine.
P1050406.JPG
P1050407.JPG
The carburetors fouled the water manifold and so had to have bits of plastic added to move them out slightly.
P1050408.JPG
The dipstick was so badly moulded I gave up and replaced it. Probably not accurate.
P1050409.JPG
Made a start on wiring up the distributor to join with the plugs and coil.
P1050410.JPG
This is going to be painfully slow and may not make it to the finish in the end!! :rolling:
Jim
 
Last edited:

Dave Ward

SMF Poster
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
363
Likes
499
Points
63
Location
South Gloucestershire
First Name
David
#8
John,
The colour doesn't help - as soon as you can get a coat of primer over everything it'll look a lot better :rolling:. It may be a bit premature, but do the wire wheels look anything like?
Dave
 

SimonT

SMF Poster
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
196
Likes
210
Points
43
Location
Yorkshire
First Name
Simon
#9
Hi Jim

I made the Matchbox 1/32 version many many moons ago

JIF cream cleaner used to be my chrome remover of choice when I did a few cars and bikes

Have a look at
You do not have permission to view link Log in or register now.
for shiny finish

I hope you are going to make some spoked wheels for it

As a cheaper option for a real one you could always get a Suffolk SS replica - they are only around 40-50 grand or so :smiling:

Those SU carbs look a little lacking in detail for the scale
 

beowulf

Styrene Bodger
Joined
Jun 13, 2013
Messages
3,286
Likes
2,131
Points
113
Location
t'norf
First Name
Paul
#10
shall be following this since ive had the same kit in the stash fo about 12 years and still not got round to it
 

Steve Jones

Apprentice Bodger
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
963
Likes
734
Points
93
Location
Plymouth
First Name
Steve
#11
Just arrived in time. I know nothing of car models so I will sit and watch on avidly as you cast your magic over this lovely looking kit. Good luck:thumb2:
 

Jim R

SMF Poster
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
814
Likes
634
Points
93
First Name
Jim
#12
Hi all
Dave - I am sure you are right. The multi coloured look is quite distracting. It is rather too hot to spray primer at present. The wheels are not too bad.
Simon - I think I will go with the kit wheels. The kit is not worth the effort of trying to make my own and I don't have your skill or trained spiders. One or two companies make replica SS100s but I think I'll save for a genuine one :rolling: Carbs are very poor but will have to do.
Paul - a good plan would be to leave it in the stash for another 12 years. It is pretty hopeless.
Steve - it will never make an accurate, detailed model but can perhaps be made into an OK representation.

Engine finished and ready for primer - just too hot at the moment. Drilling the spark plugs was fun!!
P1050411.JPG
P1050412.JPG
P1050413.JPG
P1050414.JPG

I have made a start on cleaning up the chassis parts. Just planning how to ensure it glues all square as the glue points/locating points are quite vague.
Jim
 

SimonT

SMF Poster
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
196
Likes
210
Points
43
Location
Yorkshire
First Name
Simon
#13
Just noticed the US spelling of litre on the side of the block - seems unlikely :thinking:

Good luck with the chassis alignment
 

Jim R

SMF Poster
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
814
Likes
634
Points
93
First Name
Jim
#14
Hi Simon
The 3 1/2 liter is now no more - sanded off. Reference pictures do not show it on the block anyway. Also I think that the kit engine is closer to the look of the more common 2 1/2 litre engine. I doubt it would have shown as even if the bonnet is displayed open it was low down on the far side. Anyway gone now :thumb2:
Chassis is glued and drying at the moment. To keep everything as square as I could I made a sort of jig. Taped squared paper onto a steel sheet and held all the bits in place with magnets and glued it. I'll give it an hour or so and then turn it over and wick some cement into the joints from the other side.
P1050416.JPG
Jim
 

stillp

SMF Poster
Joined
Nov 17, 2016
Messages
682
Likes
365
Points
63
First Name
Peter
#15
Interesting technique, I'll have to remember that one!

Pete
 

Jim R

SMF Poster
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
814
Likes
634
Points
93
First Name
Jim
#16
Hi all
The chassis went together nice and square and seems solid enough. Cleaned up the rear springs. In the photo the front one has been cleaned up and the one behind is straight off the sprue.
P1050418.JPG
They fitted OK.
P1050419.JPG
Lots of clean up and I replaced a lot of the bolt heads.
P1050420.JPG
Jim
 

Jim R

SMF Poster
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
814
Likes
634
Points
93
First Name
Jim
#17
Hi all
Well I said the chassis went together well and was all nice and square. It did and it was - only trouble was it didn't fit the body. Fitting the body is quite a few stages further on but I just thought I would have a quick dry fit. Good thing I did.
I had to cut the back two cross members and lengthen them and also put shims onto the body. Fits now OK :thumb2:
P1050422.JPG
P1050421.JPG
Jim
 

RM6239

SMF Poster
Joined
May 1, 2018
Messages
105
Likes
81
Points
28
Location
Australia
First Name
Ross
#18
Jim
Just caught this, good luck, lets hope it at least looks close to the real thing when finished. I'll second Alclad for the chrome etc, wear a respirator and find something small to practice on first, its very easy to over do it.
cheers
Ross
 

Jim R

SMF Poster
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
814
Likes
634
Points
93
First Name
Jim
#20
Hi all
Ross - a lot of people swear by Alclad and give the same health warnings. I was watching a YouTube video and there they showed a very thin coat over a gloss black base and it looked stunning.
Peter - thanks. I do use glue sparingly but very thin stuff and a fine brush. I also often sand back the surrounding area. Mind you I sometimes use too little and then bits drop off. A nuisance sometimes but great if I stick something wrongly and have to take it off :smiling5:
Too hot to do much today.
Jim
 
Top