Stevensons rocket as is and as was

kpnuts

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#1
hi all i was looking at a model of Stevensons Rocket and realised the one in the history museum bares no resemblance to the one we all know as he continued to modernise and try to improve on his original train so i thought i would do a doi to show the difference betweenhow it was and how it acctually is. those eagle eyed amongst you will all notice the faces are not painted, i went to have my eyes tested at the optometrist yesterday and took my glasses off for the test and would you believe it they fell apart the frame snapped and the lens fell out, so this build has been finished wearing one lens and i could not see to paint the faces and it will be a fortnight till i get my new ones.

so whats the verdict what do you think
 

kpnuts

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#6
Peter you should know it's a kit after your name Dapol formerly Airfix
 

peterairfix

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#7
\ said:
Peter you should know it's a kit after your name Dapol formerly Airfix
Doh! Silly me i should of known,i think me brains had the weekend off.

Peter t
 

eddiesolo

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#8
I like it, not for the gore, but for the fact that you depict the tragic death of William Husiksson-a member of parliament for Liverpool. He was killed on the opening day by Rocket. This is history, and many modellers seem to shy away from depicting tragedy and gore in dio's etc, yet 90% are military in nature-designed for one thing-death.

It is a hard one to comment on- but from a historical point of view, it is a rather brutal but poignant depiction of a true event. Well done for having the courage to do and show.

I of course could be well off mark and this is not what you intended :D ...in that case...I still like the choo...choo's.

Si:smiling3:
 
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eddiesolo

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#10
\ said:
That's pretty much what it depicts
Well, I think you have done a good job in displaying the first (published) account of a train accident involving a person.

Si:smiling3:
 

Willi262

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#11
I did a little digging around online about the accident (because I had no idea) and this is what I came back with

While attending the opening of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, on 15 September 1830, Huskisson rode down the line in the same train as the Duke of Wellington. At Parkside railway station, near the midpoint of the line, the locomotives made a scheduled stop to take on water. Although the railway staff had advised passengers to remain on the trains while this took place, around 50 of the dignitaries on board alighted when the Duke of Wellington's special train stopped. One of those who got off was William Huskisson, former cabinet minister and Member of Parliament for Liverpool. Huskisson had been a highly influential figure in the creation of the British Empire and an architect of the doctrine of free trade, but had fallen out with Wellington in 1828 over the issue of parliamentary reform and had resigned from the cabinet. Hoping to be reconciled with Wellington, he approached the Duke's railway carriage and shook his hand. Distracted by the Duke, he did not notice an approaching locomotive on the adjacent track, Rocket. On realising it was approaching he panicked and tried to clamber into the Duke's carriage, but the door of the carriage swung open leaving him hanging directly in the path of the oncoming Rocket. He fell onto the tracks in front of the train. His leg was horrifically mangled. The wounded Huskisson was taken by a train (driven by George Stephenson himself) to Eccles. When he reached hospital he was given a massive dose of laudanum. After being told his death was imminent he made his will, and died a few hours later.

The death and funeral of William Huskisson caused the opening of the railway to be widely reported, and people around the world became aware for the first time that cheap and rapid long-distance transport was now possible. The L&M became extremely successful, and within a month of its opening plans were put forward to connect Liverpool and Manchester with the other major cities of England. Within ten years, 1,775 miles (2,857 km) of railways had been built in Britain, and within 20 years of the L&M's opening over 6,200 miles (10,000 km) were in place. The L&M remains in operation, and its opening is now considered the start of the age of mechanised transport; in the words of industrialist and former British Rail chairman Peter Parker, "the world is a branch line of the pioneering Liverpool–Manchester run".
 

kpnuts

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#13
Thanks Steve. Nice bit of research thanks for taking the time to do it, we of course we're taught it in history at school but I suspect most of us forget (gold star for me I didn't forget sir) I am sure you are taught more Canadian based history as are other countries taught their historys.

Thanks for all the kind comments guys and galls
 
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