HMS Invincible 1/700 cyber hobby

Kit18

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Apr 16, 2015
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Steve
#1
I've eventually pulled this kit out of the cupboard and started to give it a go this afternoon. The hull structure went together really well compared to some of the starter kits I'll been trying out over the last few months etc.(I'm a complete novice compared to you guys) bar a few minor issues fit wise.
Started off by sanding the raised lines off on the flight deck 'as' advised somewhere I read online regards this build.Before I did this a few attempts of pencil rubbings were made -just to be on the safe side..(deck lines etc) . Long way to go, but I'll update when the build progresses .
 

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Joined
Apr 16, 2015
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Steve
#3
More filling,sanding and spraying and more sanding. I'm still not that happy with it so far. Looks like I went with the wrong Humbrol colour match for the deck going off a convertion chart online ...that and my novice mixing of acrylics and air spraying. I've a lot to learn!
 

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Jens Andrée

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Jens
#5
Looking great!

I've learnt (read; I'm learning) to modulate paint when it didn't turn out exactly like I imagined it by spraying a really thin layer of clear colours from Tamiya, range X-23 to X-27, to change the hue of the colour.
If a colour is too dark I can modify it somewhat by spraying a mist coat of XF-57 Buff or just a very thin coat of the base colour with added light/dark tones to change the shade.
It can't rescue when the colour is totally wrong, but you can tweak an almost correct colour.

I also practise doing the same with artist oil paint and a brush which is very handy if you're only doing a certain area, detail or panel.

A clear coat can also change the tone slightly which can be both an advantage - and a disadvantage, if you're unaware of it.

The final stage of weathering is what really changes the tone and appearance for me but I guess it's more noticeable on a banged up, dirty and muddy tank than a majestic ship... ;)

Experience in my world isn't knowing how to do it right from start - it's to know how to recover from a failure! I fail a lot so I guess I'm also learning loads... hehe...
 
Joined
Apr 16, 2015
Messages
8
Likes
3
Points
3
First Name
Steve
#6
Looking great!

I've learnt (read; I'm learning) to modulate paint when it didn't turn out exactly like I imagined it by spraying a really thin layer of clear colours from Tamiya, range X-23 to X-27, to change the hue of the colour.
If a colour is too dark I can modify it somewhat by spraying a mist coat of XF-57 Buff or just a very thin coat of the base colour with added light/dark tones to change the shade.
It can't rescue when the colour is totally wrong, but you can tweak an almost correct colour.

I also practise doing the same with artist oil paint and a brush which is very handy if you're only doing a certain area, detail or panel.

A clear coat can also change the tone slightly which can be both an advantage - and a disadvantage, if you're unaware of it.

The final stage of weathering is what really changes the tone and appearance for me but I guess it's more noticeable on a banged up, dirty and muddy tank than a majestic ship... ;)

Experience in my world isn't knowing how to do it right from start - it's to know how to recover from a failure! I fail a lot so I guess I'm also learning loads... hehe...
Thanks Jens for the reply and great advise, I'm still tying and failing but loving it! Frustrating at times ;-)