Poly cement recommendations

MrGotty

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#1
Im using Mr Cement atm but it doesnt seem to be doing the job. Im not sure if its because I primed my parts first or maybe because my mr cement leaked all over my box and dried up. Managed to salvage some but maybe its lost its integrity. Any thoughts and suggestions?
 

Jens Andrée

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#2
Tamiya extra thin is the only cement I'm using and it has no problem with acrylic primed/painted parts. It's the best brand I've tried.

These cements are more or less just MEK (methyl ethyl ketone), also known as butanone. In some countries you can buy this in large bottles which is much cheaper than packaged by the modelling companies ;)
 

BarryW

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#3
Can you confirm which Mr Cement, as there are more than one product that use this branding?

I use Mr Cement S, the one very like the Tamiya Extra Thin, but better. I really dont think you can get better for cementing, using capillary action. It is by far the best on the market and I recommend this. It is faster drying than the Tammy version and in a test Phil Flory found it has better 'penetration'. Also any surplus evaporates quicker from the surface compared to Tammy.

I also use Mr Cement DeLux, because it has a longer drying time and instead of using capillary action it is applied to the joining edge. In my view this does not give as good a 'bind' as Mr Cement S and I only use it now and then when a slower drying cement is called for and, even then, once a part is in place I apply a drop if the Mr S Cement to the join. But it certainly is a good option used the way I describe.

There is also Mr Cement Limolene and just plain old Mr Cement neither of which I use.

Overall it is the Mr Cement S that is the best you can get for general purpose jobs.
 
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#4
Can you confirm which Mr Cement, as there are more than one product that use this branding?

I use Mr Cement S, the one very like the Tamiya Extra Thin, but better. I really dont think you can get better for cementing, using capillary action. It is by far the best on the market and I recommend this. It is faster drying than the Tammy version and in a test Phil Flory found it has better 'penetration'. Also any surplus evaporates quicker from the surface compared to Tammy.

I also use Mr Cement DeLux, because it has a longer drying time and instead of using capillary action it is applied to the joining edge. In my view this does not give as good a 'bind' as Mr Cement S and I only use it now and then when a slower drying cement is called for and, even then, once a part is in place I apply a drop if the Mr S Cement to the join. But it certainly is a good option used the way I describe.

There is also Mr Cement Limolene and just plain old Mr Cement neither of which I use.

Overall it is the Mr Cement S that is the best you can get for general purpose jobs.
I've just ordered some of this stuff from John, that Kittyhawk Voodoo doesn't like Tamiya Extra Thin cement, and yes, I have washed everything! Another unforseen problem with this kit - the chances of finishing this are not good. Grrrrr.
 

BarryW

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#6
I think I just have plane old mr cement.
Then I would suggest getting Mr Cement S. Using this kind of very thin cement is very different to the thicker kind such as the basic Mr Cement. You need to join pieces and apply cement to the join with a brush (there is one in the jar). Dont overdo it. Any surplus on the surface just evaporates quite quickly while the cement is drawn into the join with capillary action, melting the plastic parts together. You can clamp parts together or, for parts such as fuselage sides, hold them together with strips of masking tape. Dont apply the cement too close to the tape as it will wick under the tape, just tack the part together at various points between the tape with the cement. Once dry and it does dry and hold quickly, one of its good points, you remove the tape then run a brush of cement along the join to seal it and get a good join ready for sanding.

It does not work well if you try applying to a part first to then mate it due to its short drying (evaporation) time. So for odd jobs where you need a slow drying cement another product is useful. Once you get the hang of using these ultra thin cements like Mr Cement S then you will not want to use anything else.
 

Gern

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#7
So for odd jobs where you need a slow drying cement another product is useful. Once you get the hang of using these ultra thin cements like Mr Cement S then you will not want to use anything else.
Gotta agree with Barry's ideas on the different uses. I use either Tamiya Extra Thin or Cement S as my "go to" adhesive (I can't say I've noticed a significant difference between them on the limited number of kits I build) and Revell Contacta for those occasions when capillary action isn't suitable.

If you're still having trouble, scrape away your primer paint from the mating surfaces before glueing.
 

Dave W

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#8
I used Revell Contacta for years. But I'm a recent convert to Tamiya extra thin. Good stuff
 
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#9
Then I would suggest getting Mr Cement S. Using this kind of very thin cement is very different to the thicker kind such as the basic Mr Cement. You need to join pieces and apply cement to the join with a brush (there is one in the jar). Dont overdo it. Any surplus on the surface just evaporates quite quickly while the cement is drawn into the join with capillary action, melting the plastic parts together. You can clamp parts together or, for parts such as fuselage sides, hold them together with strips of masking tape. Dont apply the cement too close to the tape as it will wick under the tape, just tack the part together at various points between the tape with the cement. Once dry and it does dry and hold quickly, one of its good points, you remove the tape then run a brush of cement along the join to seal it and get a good join ready for sanding.

It does not work well if you try applying to a part first to then mate it due to its short drying (evaporation) time. So for odd jobs where you need a slow drying cement another product is useful. Once you get the hang of using these ultra thin cements like Mr Cement S then you will not want to use anything else.
just taken delivery of both types of Mr Cement, and, apart from the smell (eek!) heaven knows what they put in this stuff... I am seriously impressed. Thanks for the tip!
 

John

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#11
Just to add to the Mr Cement range, I’ve just got in Mr Cement SP which is a thin quick setting glue.