Poly cement recommendations

MrGotty

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#1
Im using Mr Cement atm but it doesnt seem to be doing the job. Im not sure if its because I primed my parts first or maybe because my mr cement leaked all over my box and dried up. Managed to salvage some but maybe its lost its integrity. Any thoughts and suggestions?
 
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#2
Tamiya extra thin is the only cement I'm using and it has no problem with acrylic primed/painted parts. It's the best brand I've tried.

These cements are more or less just MEK (methyl ethyl ketone), also known as butanone. In some countries you can buy this in large bottles which is much cheaper than packaged by the modelling companies ;)
 

BarryW

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#3
Can you confirm which Mr Cement, as there are more than one product that use this branding?

I use Mr Cement S, the one very like the Tamiya Extra Thin, but better. I really dont think you can get better for cementing, using capillary action. It is by far the best on the market and I recommend this. It is faster drying than the Tammy version and in a test Phil Flory found it has better 'penetration'. Also any surplus evaporates quicker from the surface compared to Tammy.

I also use Mr Cement DeLux, because it has a longer drying time and instead of using capillary action it is applied to the joining edge. In my view this does not give as good a 'bind' as Mr Cement S and I only use it now and then when a slower drying cement is called for and, even then, once a part is in place I apply a drop if the Mr S Cement to the join. But it certainly is a good option used the way I describe.

There is also Mr Cement Limolene and just plain old Mr Cement neither of which I use.

Overall it is the Mr Cement S that is the best you can get for general purpose jobs.
 
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#4
Can you confirm which Mr Cement, as there are more than one product that use this branding?

I use Mr Cement S, the one very like the Tamiya Extra Thin, but better. I really dont think you can get better for cementing, using capillary action. It is by far the best on the market and I recommend this. It is faster drying than the Tammy version and in a test Phil Flory found it has better 'penetration'. Also any surplus evaporates quicker from the surface compared to Tammy.

I also use Mr Cement DeLux, because it has a longer drying time and instead of using capillary action it is applied to the joining edge. In my view this does not give as good a 'bind' as Mr Cement S and I only use it now and then when a slower drying cement is called for and, even then, once a part is in place I apply a drop if the Mr S Cement to the join. But it certainly is a good option used the way I describe.

There is also Mr Cement Limolene and just plain old Mr Cement neither of which I use.

Overall it is the Mr Cement S that is the best you can get for general purpose jobs.
I've just ordered some of this stuff from John, that Kittyhawk Voodoo doesn't like Tamiya Extra Thin cement, and yes, I have washed everything! Another unforseen problem with this kit - the chances of finishing this are not good. Grrrrr.
 

BarryW

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#6
I think I just have plane old mr cement.
Then I would suggest getting Mr Cement S. Using this kind of very thin cement is very different to the thicker kind such as the basic Mr Cement. You need to join pieces and apply cement to the join with a brush (there is one in the jar). Dont overdo it. Any surplus on the surface just evaporates quite quickly while the cement is drawn into the join with capillary action, melting the plastic parts together. You can clamp parts together or, for parts such as fuselage sides, hold them together with strips of masking tape. Dont apply the cement too close to the tape as it will wick under the tape, just tack the part together at various points between the tape with the cement. Once dry and it does dry and hold quickly, one of its good points, you remove the tape then run a brush of cement along the join to seal it and get a good join ready for sanding.

It does not work well if you try applying to a part first to then mate it due to its short drying (evaporation) time. So for odd jobs where you need a slow drying cement another product is useful. Once you get the hang of using these ultra thin cements like Mr Cement S then you will not want to use anything else.
 

Gern

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#7
So for odd jobs where you need a slow drying cement another product is useful. Once you get the hang of using these ultra thin cements like Mr Cement S then you will not want to use anything else.
Gotta agree with Barry's ideas on the different uses. I use either Tamiya Extra Thin or Cement S as my "go to" adhesive (I can't say I've noticed a significant difference between them on the limited number of kits I build) and Revell Contacta for those occasions when capillary action isn't suitable.

If you're still having trouble, scrape away your primer paint from the mating surfaces before glueing.
 

Dave W

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#8
I used Revell Contacta for years. But I'm a recent convert to Tamiya extra thin. Good stuff
 
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#9
Then I would suggest getting Mr Cement S. Using this kind of very thin cement is very different to the thicker kind such as the basic Mr Cement. You need to join pieces and apply cement to the join with a brush (there is one in the jar). Dont overdo it. Any surplus on the surface just evaporates quite quickly while the cement is drawn into the join with capillary action, melting the plastic parts together. You can clamp parts together or, for parts such as fuselage sides, hold them together with strips of masking tape. Dont apply the cement too close to the tape as it will wick under the tape, just tack the part together at various points between the tape with the cement. Once dry and it does dry and hold quickly, one of its good points, you remove the tape then run a brush of cement along the join to seal it and get a good join ready for sanding.

It does not work well if you try applying to a part first to then mate it due to its short drying (evaporation) time. So for odd jobs where you need a slow drying cement another product is useful. Once you get the hang of using these ultra thin cements like Mr Cement S then you will not want to use anything else.
just taken delivery of both types of Mr Cement, and, apart from the smell (eek!) heaven knows what they put in this stuff... I am seriously impressed. Thanks for the tip!
 

matto21

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#10
I can vouch for Ammo's Extra Thin too. Just started using it and impressed so far.

Matt
 

John

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#11
Just to add to the Mr Cement range, I’ve just got in Mr Cement SP which is a thin quick setting glue.
 

Stevekir

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#13
I have been using Mr. Cement S for years until the bottle was nearly empty. I am now on Mr. Cement SP. I don't notice any difference. I rarely need to use Humbrol polycement, mainly when I need to fill a gap. It is slightly more viscous and comes in a tube. I think is a mixture of the solvent and colourless polystyrene.
 

Ian M

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#14
Another Tamiya liquid user, both the regular and the extra thin. Also been using Humbrol liquid cement when the Tamiya ran out a while. That works rather well also.
For joining things that I do not want a seam line on I use the thicker Humbrol poly cement, the one in the squeezy bottle with the needle thingie. Works good and can get a good ooze going so there is something to sand back.
 

Steve O

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#15
And another vote for Tamiya extra thin, I've been using it for quite a few months now and no problems at all, it does a great job although I find it a bit strong fume wise.

Steve.
 

baz

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#16
Hello Scott,
I have been scratch building for over twenty years and model making for more years than I care to remember my only choice for for a glue as it used to be called long ago is EMA plastic weld, I used to use liquid poly for years but the odor is very strong EMA has hardly and smell but should still be used in well ventilated room, its very quick and super strong and joins almost any form of plastic it is not the cheapest on the market but having built many large scratch builds and sold quite a number of them no one has ever said that they have dropped apart is very good indeed. one tip I pour some into a small liquid poly bottle and use it then return it to the main bottle each time I am finishing a stage and keep the top on as it evaporates away if the temp is quite warm give it a try.

regards Barrie ( the old guy )
 

Gern

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#17
I made up some liquid styrene by dissolving some styrene bits in liquid glue. I put it in an empty Tamiya Extra thin bottle thinking I might be able to use the brush. I used EMA as my solvent and it dissolved the brush in the bottle as well as the styrene! I'm thinking you need to be careful how much you use on small parts in case it dissolves them.
 

baz

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#18
Hello Gern.
YES its powerful stuff I use an old paint brush to apply it to my models and over the course of a big model build the brush is looking a lot worse for wear and sometimes I have to scrape of brush hairs that have come of during application. Over all though over the many years I have been building model EMA has been the best you just ahve to be a bit careful with it. good luck with your modeling,

regards Barrie ( the old guy )
 

Jakko

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#19
I don’t normally use model cement at all, but instead buy a tin of this in a DIY store every couple of years:



and top up a Gunze-Sangyo liquid cement bottle with it when the brush in that can’t reach the contents anymore.

Though it’s marketed as a stain remover, it’s actually a solvent that will dissolve polystyrene in the same way liquid cement does, except a 250 ml tin of this costs about the same as a single bottle of liquid cement from any model kit manufacturer.

Other than that, I’ve got a tube of model glue that I sometimes (read: rarely) use to tack large parts together before applying the liquid solvent.
 

John Race

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#20
Thats interesting Jakko don't suppose we can get it in the UK I just use TET
John
 
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